Quieting the Storm

After grabbing the key that had been securely hidden from the eyes of most, I unlocked the door and stepped inside. As her professional caregiver, these were the instructions for taking care of her. She would wander the streets if the doors were not locked from the outside.

At first, it was quiet; maybe Emily was asleep and then I heard it.

“I don’t remember, you should know where Dennis lives,” her voice angry and desperate. “That’s why I called you,” she pleaded.

Knowing Emily was on the phone, I followed her anguish to the bedroom. She was pacing back and forth, the cordless in her hand. I noticed that directory assistance was talking to her. Emily had a son who lived in town named Dennis. Her husband of over 60 years was still alive, but recovering from a stroke and currently in a rehabilitation facility.

His absence played more havoc with her dementia, especially shortly before the hours of sundown. Emily’s symptoms of memory loss and confusion were much more enhanced during this time of day.

Gently taking the phone from her hand, I quickly apologized to 411 and put the phone on the receiver. Simultaneously, I grasped her arm, and looked into her eyes.

“I have Dennis’s phone number,” I said, waiting for some recognition before I continued. “Let’s call him”.

“Hi Mom,” he said and assured her that Dad would be home soon. But she would forget, and in a matter of minutes it would have to be repeated. She may not be sure of the time, date or even season. After she hung up, it seemed she had not been satisfied and started to become more agitated. Emily needed constant stimulation.

I got up and removed the painting from the nearby wall. Maybe she could tell me about the majestic movie house called The Chicago Theatre, with 1941 written on the marquee. Built in French Baroque in the 1920’s, the theatre was one of the most lavish in the country; remodeled in the 1980’s. As I brought the picture closer to her eyes, the tension began to fade.

“Oh my,” she started as she began to search for the answer, “My first date with my husband. Oh, he was such a good-looking man. The line of people that night reached all the way around the block to see The Lady Eve.”

Emily couldn’t remember if he was in the military, or his involvement in World War II, but she could remember how he held her hand in that line that seemed to stretch forever.

Giggling and moving closer while grasping my hand, she said, “I could tell he just didn’t have too much experience with the girls like I had with the guys.”

“How could you tell?” I asked.

“His hand was perspiring and shaking,” she laughed again.

“And you hooked him for sixty years…I imagine!”

“I knew he was the one the first night. He gave this painting to me for our anniversary.” She responded tenderly.

“Which anniversary?”

“I have no idea,” she giggled, “there were so many!”

Later, I found her wedding picture; a breathtaking bride with large eyes, dark hair and beautiful smile. But Emily seemed more interested in talking about her mother, after eyeing this photograph, who did not see her dressed in white because she had passed away before her marriage.

“My mom passed away just a few years ago,” I commented.

“You have a Dad,” she stated matter of fact.

“No, he is gone too.”

“Brothers and sisters?”

“Only child.” Emily just couldn’t fathom a 50+ woman to be the only one and parentless.

“I do have two children. I am a Mom like you too.”

That didn’t matter much to her; it was about who was going to take care of me. She asked if I was hungry…most mothers do. Her vivid heart and mind remained cognizant, regardless of the disability, of her partner’s love and parental obligation.

Love always somehow survives in the end. Every time I visited as her caretaker, we did it all again; sometimes the phone call, the Chicago theatre and their wedding. Always before leaving, she asked if she could cook me something to eat.

However, one Monday the routine had changed; allowing an astounding new journey to begin. Her son had told me that his daughter had just gotten married and because Emily was not in the best condition to attend the wedding, they brought the party to her the Saturday before. Emily dressed in her finest while receiving the wedding party, between the service and reception, in her living room.

New pictures were shared in front of the family fireplace; cake was cut and served along with dribbles of champagne. As I viewed the new pictures, the bride and grandmother shared the same tears.

On that autumn afternoon, with brilliant color shading the home, Emily displayed a new color in her cheeks and vibrancy in her eyes. This time she remembered every exciting detail of blossoming new love in front of her own fireplace that weekend; just like her own in first encounter in 1941.

(Originally published in Maria Shriver’s Architect of Change- Taking care of those with Alzheimers/2013http://archive.mariashriver.com/quieting-the-storm-karla-sullivan/

What successful people do

They fail…..more than once.  Because the more they put their effort into a task or project, mistakes will always be made but successful people try to learn from their mistakes. They don’t cling to the error, remain in the past or spend a lot of time focusing on what does not work. They continue to try again with a new approach and positive attitude for moving on.

Successful people have a purpose, a vision and that vision regardless of its highs and lows will keep you productive and producing the effects you want to receive. Although there are no guaranteed route to financial success, many continue to pursue their purpose and find that reward is not the number of dollars you make but in the number of relationships you establish or how you have helped family, friends  and ones you have never expected.

Successful people keep pushing to the next level always challenging themselves to be better. Many set high, almost impossible standards, but tend to come in somewhere in the middle and we respect them for never giving up and moving beyond past achievements.

Successful people truly feel that living a righteous life is key because dishonesty, cruelty and immorality will follow you and far more difficult to erase than any mistake in your business. Never do anything in your life you would be ashamed of seeing in print. Build a legacy of trust, respect and a caring example to others.

Successful people cannot succeed by themselves.  They need to network and open doors for mentors to help them progress if it is nothing more than words of encouragement. Sometimes we surround ourselves with others that are not devoted to our growth and successful people really watch for those who can tear them down. They don’t play games but choose and highlight those that are trustworthy.

Successful people always know how to redefine if necessary since they can’t control everything.  Sometimes they may  have to eliminate distractions but they continue to run their race not comparing themselves to others either. Life happens, but they stay the course and never give up.

Successful people practice a strong consistent routine even concerning their personal activities that include eating, exercise and relaxation. Because they work by the minute, not hour.

Successful people have a unique perception and awareness to help others be successful and find the answers to problems not easily understood. When solving issues or building toward a solution, they focus on the small steps they eventually climb to reach their goals

Successful people take time for mediation , prayer and gratitude.

And most of all, they know how to love.