Gayety’s Ice Cream is open

Gayety’s Candy was located on the South side of Chicago at 9207 Commercial Ave. established in 1920, over 100 years ago, right next to the Gayety Theatre. Founder James Papageorge was an immigrant stowed away on a steemer from Greece at the age of  nine. He learned everything about candy and ice cream while opening a shop next to the Gayety Theatre with the same name. It wasn’t uncommon to share the names of other businesses.I remember Mom I visiting to buy their homemade candies when I was little but they had best ice cream sundaes and banana splits with fruit cocktail. Moved to Lansing, IL and Shereville, Indiana, was closed, but has re-opened in Lansing.

Located at 3306 Ridge Rd,  Laurene Lemanski bought Gayety’s through her new company, For the Love of Chocolates and Ice Cream. Her parents grew up on the South side and went to the shop there. She actually worked at the Torrence Avenue store in Lansing in the 1980’s while attending high school.

The fruit topped banana and vanilla ice cream sundae is buried under a liberal dollop of real whipped cream and crushed nuts. They also offer seasonal flavors of ice cream depending on the time of year. Their shakes are massive, and they serve you what’s left in the tumbler too. They have ice cream chairs that are also fun to sit in enjoying the atmosphere of a real ice cream parlot.

Image courtesy of A.C.C

Ice cream facts

By Caryl Clem:

Surviving Italian Florentine rebellions, at the tender age of 14, Catherine d’Medici was to wed the second eldest son of the King of France, Henry Orleans in 1533.  Her two loves, ice cream and high heels are still around today.  She had purchased a recipe for ice cream from a goat and chicken farmer who won a contest her family sponsored. This frozen dessert won instant popularity after it was served at her wedding.  As a short new bride, Catherine wanted to ensure her grand entrance before the Royal Court of France; a stunning pair of custom made high heels was a fashion first.   Catherine became Queen of France in 1536 bearing 10 children with her husband.

Since 1686, a café that entertained the greatest thinkers in Paris was Café Procope . Famous clientele included Voltaire famous French author against tyranny, Diderot, inventor of modern encyclopedia organization, Americans Thomas Jefferson, Benjamin Franklin, and George Washington discussed world issues over coffee and ice cream.

The first recipe for ice cream used by George Washington in America had 21 steps.  Rich mansion owners had underground ice houses for blocks of ice cut in the winter.  Only the wealthy could afford the necessary ingredients.

Before Chicago, Philadelphia was an ice cream “hot spot”. Quaker schoolteacher named Louis Dubois Bassett set out to make high-quality ice creams on his rural New Jersey farm.

Fast forward to the late 1800’s when Chicago enters the ice cream market limelight.  Early vendors hawked their half Penney and Penny licks ice cream from reused, rinsed, small hand held glass containers.  Italian vendors sounded like they were saying, Hockey Pokey’s.  Believed but not proven, the more sanitary ice cream wafer cone happened at a World’s Fair Exhibition in St. Louis.  An ice cream vendor ran out of glass containers so he paired business with his neighbor selling thin wafers, rolling them then placing a scoop on top.

Gone but not forgotten the Buffalo ice Cream Parlor in Chicago.  Elaborate décor of cherubs dancing murals on the walls, leaded glass windows, rich dark walnut wood and marble top counters, amid the whirl of 20 malt mixers concocting heavenly combinations.  The Buffalo offered a perfect place to escape reality and enjoy sumptuous ice cream desserts.  The original Buffalo in Chicago opened in 1902 moving to the Irving Park in 1918.  The new location had the Commodore Theatre across the street.  Now a Shell Gas Station stands has replaced the spot ice cream was enjoyed.

At the end of the civil war, a jobless William Breyer started hand-cranking ice cream in his kitchen in Kensington outside Philadelphia then selling it to neighbors.  He was the first using a wagon equipped with a loud dinner bell to announce his location.  Breyer’s reputation rests on simple good for you ingredients for over 150 years. The cream, cane sugar, fruits and nuts ingredient base became known as the Philadelphia American style ice cream.  During the 1960’s only ice cream parlors sold the number one rated Breyers.  In the 1970’s, Breyers joined the Kraft product line.  A suburb favorite, Homer’s Homemade Gourmet Ice Cream.

In Oak Park, Petersen’s Ice Cream has been in business over 80 years. Founded by a Greek immigrant, his son, Dean Poulos, reports that his grandfather’s secret ingredient was butterfat. With décor from the 1919 era complete with tin ceiling tiles is Petersen’s Ice Cream Shop. Exploring Chicago’s ice cream history is definitely a summer treat.

Buffalo Ice Cream photo Courtesy of Patrick Crane

Rainbow Ice Cream and Rileys Trick Shop

Living on the south side in the 1960’s, we would make a trip to Rainbow Ice Cream  at 92nd and Western eating the same five-flavored ice cream cone as today; chocolate, strawberry, Palmer House (New York vanilla with cherries and walnuts), pistachio and orange sherbet. Grandpa Joe Sapp established Rainbow in 1926. His first rainbow cones were sold out of a small ice cream shack on 92nd street across the street from the building that was built four years later and still exists today. Then we visited Riley’s Trick shop that was located at 9033 Western Ave, opened in 1965. I remember getting trick cards and funny eye glasses.

Riley’s opened in 1937 at 79th and Rhodes which mainly sold greeting cards and paper goods. Jim Riley and Eleanor married three weeks after opening their shop. They had a popcorn wagon that was hurting popcorn sales at the nearby Rhodes Theatre so the manager offered them $75 for it. They invested that $75 into a line of tricks, jokes and magic, and Riley’s Trick Shop was born. In 1945, Jim Riley co-founded Magic Masters of Chicago which is still thriving today. They moved into another rented storefront at 1057 W. 79th St. in 1956. In 1965, Jim and Eleanor Riley built their own building with living quarters above at 9033 Western Ave.

In 8 years, there the business outgrew two building additions and moved to its current 5,000 square-foot location at 6442 W. 111th in Worth, Illinois. Jim and Eleanor lived above the business they loved until they passed away 27 days apart in 2002. Jim’s son moved the Worth to Palos but had to close in 2014

Rainbow Round Cake consists of all five ice cream flavors of the Rainbow Cone on top of a cake layer. Rainbow Cake Rolls are offered in 6″ and 12″ rolls. They currently offer chocolate cake rolled with five flavors of the Rainbow Cone. Over 96 years, the Sapp family is still serving the same ice cream Joseph developed back in 1926.

 

 

Presidential cool history

Caryl Clem:

An all American favorite with coast to coast popularity, resulting in the United States leading the world in the consumption and production of ice cream. As the first President faced setting a precedent for firm leadership and gracious hospitality, George Washington purchased the equipment and recipes to serve “ICE CREEM” based on the French method of including eggs and milk.  George Washington thought that strawberries and ice creem were “heavenly”. As a leading Lady hostess, Martha Washington served this new delicacy every Friday night at the receptions featured in the first White Houses in New York and Philadelphia. Dolly Madison carried on this tradition by promoting her dinners advertising the inclusion of ice cream specialties.

George Washington delayed retirement to breed dogs and raise hybrid plants to become our first leader.  He was sworn in April 30, 1789 promising faith and integrity to lead our nation forward.  He appointed the first Presidential Cabinet containing both Thomas Jefferson and Alexander Hamilton who were at opposite spectrum on political beliefs. George insisted on compromises that unified the nation to include all interests. During his terms he negotiated 5 treaties and convinced the Spanish to relinquish lands west of the Mississippi. When he left office after two terms: he commented that he regretted that the emerging political parties to gain power were losing sight of strategies to unify the country.

Benjamin Franklin, Thomas Jefferson, and James Madison were other Founding Fathers determined to enjoy ice cream at any cost ordering supplies from England, Italy, or Spain. Variations of ice cream depended on the recipe origin, Florence influenced, or French not to leave out frozen ices that contained no dairy ingredients. During colonial times many savory flavors such as “ Oyster” were popular. The current reigning favorite American standby vanilla first prospered in Philadelphia with actual vanilla bean pieces visible. A former free black White House chef,Augustus Jackson,became a successful restaurant and catering businessman opening black ice cream parlors in Philadelphia.   The first time ice cream is sold to the everyday working class. Even though he never patented his recipes or business ventures, he has earned the name of the Father of Ice Cream in the U.S.  July is National Ice Cream month designated by Ronald Reagan in 1984.

Ice cream man is coming

One called him the guy ceem man and another that I babysat for called him the good hemor( Humor) man depending on who came to visit our South side Chicago neighborhood in the 1960s. Some were on bicycles with big freezers in the front. Others were in trucks. But it was the most exciting moment of our lives when the ice cream man was coming. I liked Good Humor the best; always buying a chocolate eclair. The truck menu was complicated with many, many choices so I just stayed with the same. There was such a crowd of children….I didn’t have that much time to patiently browse the menu.

You had better be playing outside to hear their bells ringing. Back in our day, most were rain and shine. And if you were really good, you could gauge how far they were from your block so you could run inside to get money from Mom or Grandma. If Mom wasn’t home, I never remember a time missing out. Some neighborhood friend made sure everyone got ice cream as if the truck would never come back again.

And if you were truly an expert at ice cream buying, you knew the difference in bells between sellers. Popsicles were the popular choice to buy from those on bicycles and between 25 and 50 cents. Good humor ice cream bars ran between 70 cents and a dollar; my mother thought somewhat pricey at the time.

In the 1980s and 1990s speakers were more advanced so that you may here them from inside. However, all Good Humor trucks were sold in 1976 but the product can still be purchased today in grocery stores. Ice cream bikes are still around generally found on the beach or carnival.

Melody Ice Cream Company has been serving ice cream to the Chicago land area since 1979. They talk about how their Chicago Ice Cream Trucks keep the spirit of the original Good Humor man alive for children to enjoy. You can actually book an ice cream truck for a special event. They have expanded their ice cream truck inventory and our offering a soft serve ice cream truck. Their trucks are thoroughly inspected every season for any health concerns.

I am going to sit outside more often this summer and listen. I bet more adults run to the ice cream truck than children. Maybe there is an app to find out if the ice cream man is coming! Yeah, I know…. that spoils everything!

 

 

Where do you go for ice cream in Chicago?

As summer begins to blossom in Chicago and its surrounding suburbs, so do trips with family to the ice cream parlors and there is nothing like a step back in time with some of the old-time ice cream shops that are unchanged from decades earlier.  Offering superb ice cream homemade creations. During the 1893 World’s Fair in Chicago, ice cream saloons began to spring up known as ladies cafes  with lavish gaslight, mirrors and gilded chairs. Today, the best parlors also boost homemade cones, unique sauces and sundae toppings that offer fresh fruit and nuts to the already sumptuous ice cream special.

Petersens

Hans Petersen trained as Confectioner in his native land and more than 90 years ago opened his first ice cream shop in Oak Park. Creamy homemade ice cream includes such flavors Mackinac Island Fudge with rich fudge chunks in vanilla ice cream and excellent hot fudge sundaes. Distributing products throughout the US, Petersen’s offers old fashioned ambience and outdoor seating during the summer. basis.

The Brown Cow

Only a short distance from Petersens, The Brown Cow Ice Cream Parlor in Forest Park was recently featured on the Cooking Channel and Sinful Sweets. The parlor’s ice cream is homemade and they also serve freshly baked pies and cakes. Drinks feature homemade brown cow root beer  and several ice cream flavors that include bubble gum . Brown Cow will also host your next event and decorate as well.

Tates

Old fashioned ice cream in LaGrange, IL  offers walls filled with history and great opportunity for little ones to host a tea party with their favorite dessert. Family owned Tates has been making their own ice cream for over 24 years and offers a wonderful banana split, chocolate malted milk and raspberry truffle. Tates offers special days that include loving Friday Treats and the occasional special guest like Snow White.

Plush Horse

For over 75 years the Plush Horse in Palos Park offers a nostalgic atmosphere with an overwhelming selection of homemade ice cream flavors such as egg nog  for the holidays.  Plush Horse offers a variety of ice cream with out sugar added as well as sorbet that includes a Sangria flavor and a  popular caramel sea salt gelato. Parties are available in a private room of vintage charm .

Bobtail

On Broadway in Chicago, another quality ice cream parlor with cozy decor that represents the 1950’s ice cream adventure. Featuring special sundaes such a their s’more combination and  a vanilla milkshake with double espresso. Besides ice cream originals, Bobtail offers an amazing German chocolate cake and carrot cake They also sell at wholesale prices to cafes and ice cream shops looking to scoop super-premium homemade ice cream for cones, cups, sundaes and shakes

Rainbow

On the southwest side of Chicago, the original 90 year old Rainbow cone shop was  a legendary Chicago favorite. It still offers the cone that is packed with five ice cream flavors including chocolate, strawberry, Palmer House which is a New York Vanilla with cherries and walnuts, pistachio and finally orange sherbet to finish the top of the cone. Just recently, the ice cream shop will have a small kiosk on Navy Pier’s South Dock.

Finnigan’s Ice Cream Parlor

Inside the Museum of Science and Industry, Finnigan’s ice cream offers tiffany lighting and  antique servicing pieces still used to represent the turn of the century. Finnigan’s is based on a real Hyde Park ice cream parlor that opened in 1917. Ice cream including their banana split is excellent with massive scoops for servings. Finnigan’s is located on the second floor of the museum behind the coal mine

Homers Gourmet Ice Cream

Homemade gourmet ice cream was produced in 1935 and some say that gangster Al Capone was a frequent visitor for  a thick, creamy ice cream treat at Homers located in Wilmette, Il.  Still using the original recipe from Guy Poulos in 1935, Homers offers some unique flavors such as burgandy cherry, green tea and kona Hawaiian coffee ice cream. They also offer a wide variety of fruit sherberts and frozen yogurts.

Capannari Ice Cream

A quaint little shop located in Mount Prospect, IL, Capannari old fashioned ice cream is another great stop on your ice cream journey famous for their black forest licorice flavor and madagascar vanilla. Capannari hosts a multitude of free, family events including their signature Mooo-vie Night and Concert -In-The-Park Series, also supporting local schools. Others have also raved over the cherry Bordeaux and chocolate peanut butter crunch.