Presidential cool history

Caryl Clem:

An all American favorite with coast to coast popularity, resulting in the United States leading the world in the consumption and production of ice cream. As the first President faced setting a precedent for firm leadership and gracious hospitality, George Washington purchased the equipment and recipes to serve “ICE CREEM” based on the French method of including eggs and milk.  George Washington thought that strawberries and ice creem were “heavenly”. As a leading Lady hostess, Martha Washington served this new delicacy every Friday night at the receptions featured in the first White Houses in New York and Philadelphia. Dolly Madison carried on this tradition by promoting her dinners advertising the inclusion of ice cream specialties.

George Washington delayed retirement to breed dogs and raise hybrid plants to become our first leader.  He was sworn in April 30, 1789 promising faith and integrity to lead our nation forward.  He appointed the first Presidential Cabinet containing both Thomas Jefferson and Alexander Hamilton who were at opposite spectrum on political beliefs. George insisted on compromises that unified the nation to include all interests. During his terms he negotiated 5 treaties and convinced the Spanish to relinquish lands west of the Mississippi. When he left office after two terms: he commented that he regretted that the emerging political parties to gain power were losing sight of strategies to unify the country.

Benjamin Franklin, Thomas Jefferson, and James Madison were other Founding Fathers determined to enjoy ice cream at any cost ordering supplies from England, Italy, or Spain. Variations of ice cream depended on the recipe origin, Florence influenced, or French not to leave out frozen ices that contained no dairy ingredients. During colonial times many savory flavors such as “ Oyster” were popular. The current reigning favorite American standby vanilla first prospered in Philadelphia with actual vanilla bean pieces visible. A former free black White House chef,Augustus Jackson,became a successful restaurant and catering businessman opening black ice cream parlors in Philadelphia.   The first time ice cream is sold to the everyday working class. Even though he never patented his recipes or business ventures, he has earned the name of the Father of Ice Cream in the U.S.  July is National Ice Cream month designated by Ronald Reagan in 1984.