Gayety’s Ice Cream is open

Gayety’s Candy was located on the South side of Chicago at 9207 Commercial Ave. established in 1920, over 100 years ago, right next to the Gayety Theatre. Founder James Papageorge was an immigrant stowed away on a steemer from Greece at the age of  nine. He learned everything about candy and ice cream while opening a shop next to the Gayety Theatre with the same name. It wasn’t uncommon to share the names of other businesses.I remember Mom I visiting to buy their homemade candies when I was little but they had best ice cream sundaes and banana splits with fruit cocktail. Moved to Lansing, IL and Shereville, Indiana, was closed, but has re-opened in Lansing.

Located at 3306 Ridge Rd,  Laurene Lemanski bought Gayety’s through her new company, For the Love of Chocolates and Ice Cream. Her parents grew up on the South side and went to the shop there. She actually worked at the Torrence Avenue store in Lansing in the 1980’s while attending high school.

The fruit topped banana and vanilla ice cream sundae is buried under a liberal dollop of real whipped cream and crushed nuts. They also offer seasonal flavors of ice cream depending on the time of year. Their shakes are massive, and they serve you what’s left in the tumbler too. They have ice cream chairs that are also fun to sit in enjoying the atmosphere of a real ice cream parlot.

Image courtesy of A.C.C

Four more Chicago land candy shops

Windy City Sweets has specialized in candy and handmade chocolates since 1983. Located on Broadway in Chicago, some of their bestsellers are their handmade chocolate fudge and their elegant chocolate truffles sold in a beautiful box. Windy City Sweets has over 1,200 different products. They were also named 2017 Best Candy Store by Chicago Magazine and one of the Cutest Ice Cream Shops in the USA by Cosmopolitan Magazine. They have a full menu of quality ice cream as well.

Candyality is described as chewy, colorful, and crunchy, just a few of the words that describe their candy creations. Candyality carries thousands of bulk items and sweet treats including gummies, sours, taffy, and more. Need M & M’s in 21 colors? They have it. They carry all the nostalgic brands. Chicago entrepreneur, born and raised in the city, Terese McDonald love the penny candy memories of her childhood. A former sales and training executive, she opened Candyality in 2007. In Food Network magazine, they were voted best candy shop in in Illinois. There are two stores one located on Southport Ave and the other on Clark St.

Galena’s Kandy Kitchen was established in 1974 when George Paxton left Chicago and the overwhelming business of computers to come to Galena, Illinois, and open his confectionery. His father William (Bill) Paxton helped initiate Chuckles candy in the 1930’s and continued on inspiring his son until he retired from the candy business at the age of 98. They are known locally for their “Pecan Georgies” named after George. George passed away from cancer in 2011.  Galena’s Kandy Kitchen is known for its delicious hand-molded chocolate bars with potato chips as well as great jelly beans that can be purchased online.

Andersons Candy Shop in Richmond offers an interesting history with Arthur Anderson beginning a candy shop in 1919 in Chicago and then moved his family to Richmond in 1926, purchasing a home. He ran his business out of his front porch and living room selling candy months that were not hot and ice cream in the summer. In 1933, his business took on new meaning after Grandpa and his family visited the Chicago  World’s Fair. He came home with the first air conditioner in McHenry County, of course, this purchase allowed him to sell  chocolates year round. Some of their bestsellers are the buttercream and handmade caramel.

The best candy shops began in Chicago

For me, my weakness has been a toss up between ice cream and homemade candy. Celebrating National Candy month, the following shops described in the article began in Chicago and still exist today. Another article will explore suburban favorites.

Margie’s Candies story begins in 1921 George Poulos opened an ice cream parlor on the North Side. The shop became known as Margie’s Candies in 1933, when Poulos’ son George Peter Poulos married Margie Michaels. Still family owned, Margie’s is known for their fudge and Kosher dark chocolate. Many love the variety of homemade ice cream as well. Margie’s original location is still open at Western Avenue.

Fannie May  continues to provide the best in new gourmet chocolate creations as well as traditional favorites.The first Fannie May retail store was opened by H. Teller Archibald in 1920 at 11 N. LaSalle St. in Chicago. Fannie May is also a great way to bring profits to your fundraiser and offer gifts to your business clients. Fannie May is available for pick up by calling any Fannie May store, which you can check out here to find a location near you!

Another charming shop decorated with original Tiffany lamps, an old-fashioned Coke machine and other memorabilia bought by the family is located on Montrose Avenue. Amy’s Candy Bar is located in Lincoln Square was opened in 2011 originally inspired by Amy’s grandmother,Geraldine. As a child, Amy spent hours watching and helping her grandmother bake but decided to forge a career with a degree in psychology and marketing. She worked in corporate America in later years. In 2006, she decided to leave her present position and enroll in the French Pastry School in Chicago. Amy’s shop offers some of the best hand-crafted confections that include her signature sea salt caramel. You can also order your favorites online.

Katherine Anne Confections promotes cocktail truffle” month in their kitchen, and they thought a banana daiquiri truffle would be a great choice for the month. Extra ripe bananas, white rum, and milk/semisweet chocolate with a touch of sea salt is part of the creation. At the age of 10, Katherine would use cream from her family’s Jersey cows to create soft, old-fashioned caramels on their farm in Wisconsin. “Katherine’s Karamels” were sold at her Dad’s office and quickly became a local favorite. In 2012, Katherine opened her cafe in the Logan Square neighborhood on Armitage and she also offers excellent coffee drinks.

Cunis Candies originally opened its doors in 1933 on 79th street by George Askounis. Now, Kathy Biesiada owns the store in South Holland which has been a south side favorite since 1971 and still family owned. Cunis is especially known for their ice cream as well. Some delights include the Turtle Sundae and Peach Ice Cream topped with fresh peaches, the latter available in June. They take pride in their homemade chocolates that include freshly dipped turtles, chocolate strawberry’s, chocolate covered orange peels and in the fall, the best caramel apples;  which are first dipped in caramel, rolled in pecans, then drizzled with around a quarter pound of milk or dark chocolate.

Cupid Candies,another family owned business was founded by Paul Stefanos in 1936 has been producing quality chocolate and serving Chicago land residents in their own retail stores for the past 68 years. The first store was at 79th and Ashland, where only fudge, toffee, and popcorn were sold. By 1940 Paul Stefanos, and his wife Pauline, opened another store at 3207 W. 63 rd Street, along with a small manufacturing facility, where the chocolate line really grew. They continue to manufacture chocolate for some of the finest candy shops in Chicago that include Crate and Barrel. Currently, three locations are available in Chicago, Oaklawn and Orland Park that offer a soda fountain service.

 

Where do you go for ice cream in Chicago?

As summer begins to blossom in Chicago and its surrounding suburbs, so do trips with family to the ice cream parlors and there is nothing like a step back in time with some of the old-time ice cream shops that are unchanged from decades earlier.  Offering superb ice cream homemade creations. During the 1893 World’s Fair in Chicago, ice cream saloons began to spring up known as ladies cafes  with lavish gaslight, mirrors and gilded chairs. Today, the best parlors also boost homemade cones, unique sauces and sundae toppings that offer fresh fruit and nuts to the already sumptuous ice cream special.

Petersens

Hans Petersen trained as Confectioner in his native land and more than 90 years ago opened his first ice cream shop in Oak Park. Creamy homemade ice cream includes such flavors Mackinac Island Fudge with rich fudge chunks in vanilla ice cream and excellent hot fudge sundaes. Distributing products throughout the US, Petersen’s offers old fashioned ambience and outdoor seating during the summer. basis.

The Brown Cow

Only a short distance from Petersens, The Brown Cow Ice Cream Parlor in Forest Park was recently featured on the Cooking Channel and Sinful Sweets. The parlor’s ice cream is homemade and they also serve freshly baked pies and cakes. Drinks feature homemade brown cow root beer  and several ice cream flavors that include bubble gum . Brown Cow will also host your next event and decorate as well.

Tates

Old fashioned ice cream in LaGrange, IL  offers walls filled with history and great opportunity for little ones to host a tea party with their favorite dessert. Family owned Tates has been making their own ice cream for over 24 years and offers a wonderful banana split, chocolate malted milk and raspberry truffle. Tates offers special days that include loving Friday Treats and the occasional special guest like Snow White.

Plush Horse

For over 75 years the Plush Horse in Palos Park offers a nostalgic atmosphere with an overwhelming selection of homemade ice cream flavors such as egg nog  for the holidays.  Plush Horse offers a variety of ice cream with out sugar added as well as sorbet that includes a Sangria flavor and a  popular caramel sea salt gelato. Parties are available in a private room of vintage charm .

Bobtail

On Broadway in Chicago, another quality ice cream parlor with cozy decor that represents the 1950’s ice cream adventure. Featuring special sundaes such a their s’more combination and  a vanilla milkshake with double espresso. Besides ice cream originals, Bobtail offers an amazing German chocolate cake and carrot cake They also sell at wholesale prices to cafes and ice cream shops looking to scoop super-premium homemade ice cream for cones, cups, sundaes and shakes

Rainbow

On the southwest side of Chicago, the original 90 year old Rainbow cone shop was  a legendary Chicago favorite. It still offers the cone that is packed with five ice cream flavors including chocolate, strawberry, Palmer House which is a New York Vanilla with cherries and walnuts, pistachio and finally orange sherbet to finish the top of the cone. Just recently, the ice cream shop will have a small kiosk on Navy Pier’s South Dock.

Finnigan’s Ice Cream Parlor

Inside the Museum of Science and Industry, Finnigan’s ice cream offers tiffany lighting and  antique servicing pieces still used to represent the turn of the century. Finnigan’s is based on a real Hyde Park ice cream parlor that opened in 1917. Ice cream including their banana split is excellent with massive scoops for servings. Finnigan’s is located on the second floor of the museum behind the coal mine

Homers Gourmet Ice Cream

Homemade gourmet ice cream was produced in 1935 and some say that gangster Al Capone was a frequent visitor for  a thick, creamy ice cream treat at Homers located in Wilmette, Il.  Still using the original recipe from Guy Poulos in 1935, Homers offers some unique flavors such as burgandy cherry, green tea and kona Hawaiian coffee ice cream. They also offer a wide variety of fruit sherberts and frozen yogurts.

Capannari Ice Cream

A quaint little shop located in Mount Prospect, IL, Capannari old fashioned ice cream is another great stop on your ice cream journey famous for their black forest licorice flavor and madagascar vanilla. Capannari hosts a multitude of free, family events including their signature Mooo-vie Night and Concert -In-The-Park Series, also supporting local schools. Others have also raved over the cherry Bordeaux and chocolate peanut butter crunch.

 

The Sucker Tree

My grandfather’s whitewashed farmhouse was located in small town, central Illinois framed by an ever-changing horizon and guarded by cornstalks.  Each had grown tall with gangling arms, restive and ready to capture their trespassers, twisting their leafy fingers round and round, threatening to arrest me. I was only six years old then.

I quickly made my way inside the chipped picket fence, protected from the grasp of the tawny soldiers.

The screen door creaked and cracked like the bones of an elder, opening and shutting again as Granddad reached for me with outstretched arms of endearment.

Behind the thick panes of his spectacles, his narrow eyes glistened with delight.  His face flushed with excitement, the color of the early autumn foliage that vividly shaded his home that day.

“I have another surprise for you, little one,” he spoke in a whisper.

Of course, I was expecting this and returned his words with a huge grin.  Once again, Granddad had not let me down for my visits were always greeted with something truly wonderful, a phenomena for the entire world to see but, unfortunately, allowed for Granddad and my eyes only!

He slowly took a seat in his polished, Hitchcock rocker and I piled into his lap, anxious to listen.

“Out back, only a few feet away from the house, my child, something very special is happening,” he said.

“What is it, Granddad?”  I responded, eyes wide with childhood curiosity.

He paused for a moment to gather his thought, clearing his aged vocal cords as well.

“A tree is just starting to bloom!”

……….Granddad had topped himself with amazing stories this time!  I wondered if his mind had taken a wrong turn somewhere, the grownups called it senility, I think.  Anyway, I was always considered bright for my years and knew better to believe that trees did not prosper during this particular season!  Leaves transformed from green to brown, then withered and fell to the ground to be either raked away or covered with blankets of snow at the onset of winter weather.  It didn’t take experience in years to attain that knowledge so what was this man fabricating now?

I was extremely disappointed, to say the least.

“Granddad, trees don’t bloom in autumn!”  I said in defiance.

“This one does,” he answered confidently.

Granddad had never lied to me in the past.  Did he really know something that the rest of Illinois and I had not encountered.  It was certainly possible.  In fact anything was possible.

“What kind of tree is it?”  I asked, attempting to pacify Granddad, giving him the benefit of the doubt.

“A sucker tree!”  he proudly announced.  “When all the other trees and shrubs shed their leafy dress, this tiny tree begins to thrive with lollipops of rainbow colors.  One by one, they pop out like magic with stems and all, dangling from the branches.  When each sucker is ripe and just the right size, they can be picked and eaten.”

As Granddad continued to go on and on, I was mesmerized by his delightful description.  This was too good…..just too good to be true!  However, once again, Granddad had me right where he wanted me.

“Are the suckers ripe now?”  I asked, nearly jumping out of his lap.

“Well, let’s find out,” he suggested as we climbed out of the rocker and quickly headed to the backyard.

He gestured for me to go first and my impatience caused me to slide down the back steps, my bottom sore and surely splintered right through my pants!

I didn’t care because, only a few inches from me, a miracle really was occurring right before my startling eyes.

A young tree, only a foot or two taller than myself, caught my undivided attention.  Its’ trunk looked like any other and it was naked of leaves but, lo and behold, lollipops, approximately four inches round, hung delicately on their stems from each branch.  There were five or six already in bloom and pink, blue, yellow, and green colors swirled in their centers.  Each childhood delicacy gently swayed to the tunes of the afternoon breeze.

“Can I pick one?”  I uttered in a small voice.

This was a sight that would be locked in my memory for all time.

“Why, of course,” he smiled.  “Two, if you like”

My mouth watered as I let my tongue whirl around on the colors, blending the pinks into the blues, creating my own masterpiece and savoring its’ flavor while the sucker shrunk in size, eventually disappearing into my belly.

I hugged Granddad tightly, thanking him for letting me share this fascinating September event.

The following year in early autumn, Granddad had passed to another land and my heart ached for his return that could never be.  I would miss him for many years to come.

After his funeral, I removed myself from the crowd and took a seat on those familiar back steps to gaze on nature’s evolution.  Each tree had changed color and their leaves began to drop to their demise, almost like what had happened to my Granddad.

I then focused on the sucker tree.  Its’ barren branches seemed to stretch wearily toward the sky as if asking God to return my Granddad.  Not one lollipop adorned its’ arms.  The tree was lost without him for only Granddad knew the secret ingredients that could provide the tree with eternal like.  The sucker tree had become a fabric of memory along with my brilliant Granddad sitting beside it.

The best of Chicago land’s homemade candy

For me, my weakness has been a toss up between ice cream and homemade candy. My vintage trips to Marshall Fields always called for a box of Frango mints and some of Chicago lands favorite home made candy shops offer those delectable mints today.

As a last minute stocking stuffer, my daughter runs to the grocery store to add a couple of bags of Lindt’s Lindor truffles which has been around since 1845.  I can eat one bag in a few minutes. For many, the following shops have been favorites for decades, a pride of the best Chicago businesses and some also offer home-made ice cream.

Margie’s Candies story begins in 1921 when  George Poulos opened an ice cream parlor on the North Side. The shop became known as Margie’s Candies in 1933, when Poulos’ son George Peter Poulos married Margie Michaels. Still family owned, Margie’s is known for their delicious fudge, Kosher dark chocolate wrapped in handmade boxes. Many ice cream connoisseurs love the varieties of homemade ice cream flavors as well. Margie’s original location is still open at Western Avenue. The only good complaint I have heard about Margie’s is that their lines can be long at times and they do have a second location on Montrose Avenue.

Amy’s Candy Bar located in Lincoln Square was opened in 2011 originally inspired by Amy’s grandmother, Geraldine. As a child, Amy spent hours watching and helping her grandmother bake but decided to forge a career with a degree in psychology and marketing. She worked in corporate America in later years.  But her initial passion for candy told her to follow her heart. In 2006, she decided to leave her present position and enroll in the French Pastry School in Chicago. Amy’s shop offers some of the best, award winning, hand-crafted confections that include her signature sea salt caramel. You can also order your favorites online.

Katherine Anne Confections began her candy adventure at the age of 10, when Katherine would use cream from her family’s Jersey cows to create soft, old-fashioned caramels on their farm in Wisconsin. “Katherine’s Karamels” were sold at her Dad’s office and quickly became a local favorite. The amazing confections were launched in 2006; everyone ordering her famous chocolate for the holidays. Finally, in 2012, Katherine opened her cafe in the Logan Square neighborhood on Armitage and she also offers excellent coffee drinks to compliment her sweets. They have a great online store and host corporate events.

Galena’s Kandy Kitchen was established in 1974 when George Paxton left Chicago and the overwhelming business of computers that he worked to come to Galena, Illinois, and open his confectionery. His father William (Bill) Paxton helped to create Chuckles candy in the 1930’s and continued on inspiring his son until he retired from the candy business at the age of 98. They are known locally for their “Pecan Georgies” named after George. George passed away from cancer in 2011.  Galena’s Kandy Kitchen is known for its awesome hand-molded chocolate bars with potato chips as well as excellent jelly beans that can be purchased online.

Andersons Candy Shop in Richmond IL offers an interesting history with Arthur Anderson beginning a candy shop in 1919 in Chicago and then moved his family to Richmond in 1926, purchasing a home there. He ran his business out of his front porch and living room selling candy during months that were not hot and ice cream in the summer. In 1933, his business took on new meaning after Grandpa and his family visited the Chicago World’s Fair. He came home with the first air conditioner in McHenry County, of course, this ingenious purchase allowed him to sell  chocolates year round. Some of their bestsellers are the delectable buttercream, handmade caramel and something new, smore’s bars!

Old Fashioned Candies began its journey in Chicago in 1969 and moved to Berwyn in 1971. Owned by George and Theresa Brunslik, a fire almost wiped them out but the family business is still going strong with a second store in Indian head Park. Both stores offer some great ideas for celebrating events with hand made chocolate party trays as well as Cubs and Socks Suckers. But Old Fashioned Candies truly specializes in great party favors for a new baby, graduation or wedding. Customers rave about the best chocolate covered strawberries that are available daily. Another favorite are frozen chocolate covered bananas and they ship throughout the US.

Cunis Candies originally opened its doors in 1933 on 79th street by George Askounis. The store was between the streets of Kingston and Colfax; a neighborhood I grew up and my family visited their shop many times. Now, Kathy Biesiada owns the store in South Holland which has been a south suburban favorite since 1971 and still family owned. Again, a shop that followed me or I followed them when I went to high school at Thornridge in Dolton. Cunis is also known for their amazing ice cream. Some delights include the Turtle Sundae and Peach Ice Cream topped with fresh peaches, the latter available in the summer months. They take pride in their homemade chocolates that include freshly dipped turtles,  chocolate covered orange peels and in the fall, the best caramel apples.

Gayety offers beautifully boxed assortments of homemade chocolates that include Muddles Pecan Caramels, Chocolate Almond Clusters and Butter Toffee. Gayety also serves ice cream and has shops in Lansing IL and Schereville, Indiana. James Papageorge came to America and purchased his ice cream shop Gayety’s,  located on Commercial Avenue next to The Gayety Movie Theater in South Chicago in 1936. He worked seven days a week;  never giving up the passion that meant so much to him. Lee started his career at the Gayety as a responsible and an active 12 year old eager to follow in his uncle’s footstep, then his son Jim became in charge in 2003 and the shop is still family owned.

Cupid Candies is another family owned business, founded by Paul Stefanos in 1936 and has been producing quality chocolates; serving Chicago land residents in their own retail stores for the past 68 years. The first store was at 79th and Ashland, where only fudge, toffee, and popcorn were sold. By 1940 Paul Stefanos, and his wife Pauline, opened another store at 3207 W. 63 rd Street, along with a small manufacturing facility, where the chocolate line really advanced. They continue to manufacture chocolate for some of the finest candy shops in Chicago offering a wonderful melt-away mint. Currently, three locations are available in Chicago, Oaklawn and Orland Park that offer a soda fountain service.