College ready

WRITTEN BY CARYL CLEM:

I remember senior year in high school as a continual state of anxiousness.  I wanted to leave a paper trail I was proud to achieve in 1966. The final tests, grades, college letters of application were done.  Discussions of future hopes and dreams had chosen a university in Wisconsin. The exhilaration of high school graduation had barely subsided when the whirlwind of college preparation started.  Time melted in the heat and daily plans to find supplies.  I had worked through high school and was eager to spend my hard earned money.  My parents managed to convince me to practice budget control. I knew in my heart they were right. You will find more to spend money on once you settle in. Carrying one suitcase and my favorite pillow, I arrived at my dorm ready to start college life.

As a volunteer in a charity thrift store the past few weeks this summer, as bound -for- college hopefuls search for items on their list, it renews the passions I felt getting ready for my next big move in life. The items on the list have increased for today’s digital age, but the glow in their eyes and the excitement in their voices confirm that this is a major event.  Several advantages of a degree remain true such as  higher pay (56% more than a high school diploma), the lowest group for unemployment (2.5), plus a reference proving your abilities and dedication. The National Center for Education Statistics provides a wealth of information.

Looking back on what I did not do to get ready for college, I did think about my personality  needs.  I had all the materials necessary but left out the mental preparation.  My first year in college was a disaster, cutting classes since there was no attendance. I hated the noisy, crowded dorm.  My family prepared or grew most of the food I consumed so the cafeteria food tasted like gruel.  Meals were provided by the vending machines serving sugar laden ice cream sandwiches, salty Fritos, and Coke. In 7 months I had developed over 12 cavities and some very serious health issues.

My grades were still in the C range-but the first semester of my sophomore year I dropped out.  Bill Gates has said, “The U. S.  has the largest dropout rate. We are number one in terms of people who start college but we’re number 20 in terms of people who finish college. “

An increasing number of students are enrolling in vocational schools; over 7 million will start college using this avenue. Vocational schools offer a two year degree for an average cost of $33,000 compared to a 4 year degree average cost of $124,000.  Changing my school environment, I enrolled in a vocational school choosing a major I loved while living in a cheap apartment.  I established relationships with my professors.  A student loan was acquired and then I applied for a scholarship to transfer into a four year degree program to follow the two year degree.  I graduated from Northeastern University in Chicago with a B.A. in 1978 and later earned a Master’s from National Louis in Evanston in 1982.

My Mother’s motive for college was to find a husband.  Today the number of males enrolled in college keeps decreasing.  The average time to earn a degree varies; the national average is 6 years.  A freshman in college can be any age; the demographics of a university classroom reflect the spectrum of people pursuing their college dream.

Over 20 million hopefuls will enter college this fall. The most successful students know that the college lifestyle is demanding and requires self-discipline.  College can be a success for any student who is determined, persistent, boosted by faith that this dream will come true.

What Baby Boomers didn’t know

Those over 60 were taught that we would retire with a substantial savings from a company we had worked for all of our adult lives.

Unfortunately, our parents lied to us.

They did not teach us how to jump from one job to the next and still be able to hobble to the workplace at the tender age of 72.

They didn’t teach us about the healthcare market; astronomical costs to maintain our health. They went from insurance on the job that the company paid for, after decades of working for the same company and retired directly into Medicare.

They did not teach us that we would be competing with youth of all ages and that are experience and wisdom didn’t mean quite the same as it did for them in the workplace

They also did not tell us that people would be promoted whether they were qualified or not.

They taught us about establishing college funds for our own children but forgot to tell us how much we needed to send our kids to school.

They did not tell us that our tri-level home or two-story condo would cause havoc on the kneecaps and that a steady banister on stairs would actually be useful.

They did not teach us to celebrate our golden anniversaries and birthdays with a designated driver. In fact, they left out the part that one alcoholic beverage would knock us out and caffeine would keep us up all night.

They did not teach us organization tips like putting our keys in the same spot every day so we didn’t have to rely on failing memory to find them.

They did not show us the proper way to go down a playground slide with our grandkids.

Unfortunately, in their timeline, there was no way to teach us about internet violence, terrorism,  social media political back-stabbing, online buying subject to constant security checks and threats.

We were taught to never speak in public about politics or religion.

We were taught decorum and respect.

We were taught to trust.

They didn’t tell us that we would hate crowds, loud music, traffic jams and driving in bad weather. They didn’t let us know that we would be fearful driving in blizzards and that is why their older counterparts moved to warmer climates. Now we know!

They didn’t tell us that we would be screaming out 1973 after a song recorded 40 years ago had been played. Nor did they admit that 40 years ago would seem like yesterday.

They didn’t tell us about constant maintenance and more maintenance of the mind, body and spirit. And they didn’t tell us about the exhaustion that came with all that constant maintenance as well as a waistline that would continue to bloom regardless of what we did to decrease it.

Finally, they did not teach us how we should take care of them. They never wanted to go there and neither did we.

What We Do Have

When I take the time to look back and remember, my aunt used to always tell me that it was hell to get old. I was just too ignorant to listen. Why should we, old age was incomprehensible and would never happen to us. Surprise!

They didn’t say surprise when we started to falter or that, ultimately, old age would sneak up on us and be filled with all sorts of surprises.

It all depended on how you looked at it.

For me, however, they did give me one quality of life that is timeless and I intend to keep regardless of the aging factor and that is a sense of humor!

Hopefully, the rest of you can laugh at yourselves as the gifts of aging, keep on giving. 

And the love we shared in our youth for many is stronger in memory than ever before.

Actually, those are the healthiest resources we have!