Best HOPE campaign: Hope’s Front Door

Contributed by Janell Robinson, Executive Director of Hope’s Front Door

On her second birthday, Jill made her first visit to Hope’s Front Door. You see her mother, Teia, lost her job two months ago but has a lead on a new one through an area employment agency.  Jill and her brother, Jon, were as patient as they could be while their mom learned about Hope’s Front Door’s weekly job list and job coaches.

Jill and Jon received new donated Beanie Babies to play with as their mother explained that she was really hopeful the new job would lead to an improved life for her and her children. “Things have started to get tight and this new job could mean stability and better things for the kids; receiving the gas vouchers to go to the interview means a lot to me and my family.” Teia explained.

While the family is hopeful about the future job opportunity, they are still concerned about how to meet financial challenges occurring right now. Jon said he would be in 1st grade this fall and was excited.  Part of helping Jon maintain that enthusiasm for a new school year is making sure he has the tools needed to succeed. But with limited resources, purchasing school supplies can seem daunting. The family will be attending the READY. SET. LEARN! back to school supply giveaway at Hope’s Front Door to make sure the school year starts off on the right foot.

Life was a blur and out of focus for Kayla when she was 16 years old. But with the help from Hope’s Front Door, life became much clearer.

“I have had glasses since the fifth grade. Last year, I outgrew the prescription and they broke. My eye sight was getting blurry when I looked at things. I can see close up, but far away is a problem when looking at chalkboards or whiteboards in the front of the class,” Kayla said.

Kayla’s mom was newly separated and unemployed. So, Kayla tried to make due while her mom looked for a job that would provide insurance. They also waited for their application for Illinois’ All Kids insurance program to be approved, which could take up to 45 to 90 days. She did not want to bother her mom when she knew that money was tight in their household.

“I used to really stress about it myself. It was hard knowing my mom was worried about money and providing for us and looking for work. She’s my mom. I tried to put some of the burden on my own shoulders, so she wouldn’t have to worry. I tried wearing a pair of my mom’s old glasses and that was okay for a while. Then they broke and that was no longer an option,” she explained.

Kim, Kayla’s Mom, came into Hope’s Front Door seeking assistance in search of vouchers for her job search transportation and food for her and Kayla. Not only was she able to receive those items, but an eye exam and glasses for Kayla were provided as well!

During HFD’s Back to School Project, which runs through August, Kayla was also thrilled to have been able to receive school supplies.

“I got pens, pencils and a book bag. I used all of the paper. I at least had something to start out with for the new school year. It’s important to have folders and paper for US History and workshops. It would have been bad to start the first day having to ask another student for

So many of the children who have participated in HFD’s Back to School Project echo Kayla’s comments.

“Thanks to Hope’s Front Doors generosity Kayla, now 17 years old, can see just fine and had the necessary supplies to help her succeed in school. Last year, their investment helped over 1100 area children, kids like Kayla” said Kim.

Hope’s Front Door often acts as a “first responder” to neighbors who are facing financial and/or medical crises. They play an integral role in ensuring the well-being of individuals, families and the overall communities they support. When clients walk through the doors, they determine their immediate needs. They help them with either food, medical, dental and/or transportation vouchers, plus a clear pathway into the network of social agencies that can assist them with the long-term restructuring of their lives, by helping move them out of living a “crisis to crisis existence”.

They serve the homeless, as well as those seeking assistance in six local communities. Childhood hunger is not just something that happens in other cities or counties. One in six children living in DuPage County experiences food insecurity. Everyday Hope’s Front Door provides food vouchers to help area families have access to fresh food.  Over 72,000 live in poverty in DuPage County, once known as a fairly stable employment community, with over 27,000 living in extreme conditions.  Currently,Hope’s Front Door is seeing an 18% increase in the number of children assisted compared to last year.

As a community, we can help children like Jill, Jon and Kayla as their families experience a financial rough patch. By donating to the READY. SET. LEARN! school supply drive you can help Jon and other kids have the things needed to learn on day one.

By giving to the Best HOPE Campaign you can ensure that kids like Jill have access to basic necessities like food, transportation, medication, oral healthcare and eye exams/eye glasses. Please join us at Shanahan’s Food & Spirits (1999 75th St, Woodridge, IL 60517) to support both projects! On August 2nd we will be accepting school supplies…and 20% of the sales from your dining bill, with event flyer, will to help children through the Best HOPE Campaign!

Please join the Best HOPE Campaign to benefit area children. Now until September 30, Hope’s Front Door would like to raise $20,000 to help more than 250 children with food and school supplies as well as access to medication, dental and vision healthcare . . . even financial literacy.

Your donations will make a huge difference in the lives of our neighborhood children! 

For more information on the READY. SET. LEARN! project and Best HOPE Campaign, please visit www.hopesfrontdoor.org.

Childhood road trips: Good Old Neon

As a Baby Boomer child  in the car traveling  with my parents, there were no cell phones to play or movies to watch on video players. You were lucky if your parents played games like 20 questions, Name that Tune or Alphabet  where you would look for every letter of the alphabet from the road signs you passed. It could be any sign but neon were easy to see with their beautiful varieties of color, sparkle and great logos.

Though for me, I didn’t really care about the games. Unfortunately, reading a book while traveling made me sick. I just loved to pass the majestic signs. Ultimately, it was the neon signs alone that offered a colorful road trip suggesting great places to visit such as Kiddieland , Margies Candies or the Seven Dwarfs Restaurant.  How my parents loved the Green Mill Lounge with its beautiful gold array of lights highlighting the green title,even back in the days of mafia connections.

I always wanted to stay at the Tangiers Motel…something I thought…  truly out of the country. Fortunately, I was spoiled. When I pointed and cheered with determination at the mesmerizing neons, we would actually stop at many taking advantage of the rides, sweets or a chocolate shake; maybe even an overnight stay.

Remember Dell Rhea’s Chicken Basket neon sign in Willowbrook?  I am only a few miles from the Chicken Basket and the sign still guides me today…one of my favorite restaurants.

Nick Freeman felt the same way about neon growing up and Chicago’s rich neon heritage is published in his full-color collection of delightful signs. From the South Side of Chicago to Wisconsin, his book Good Old Neon  spotlights the familiar signs captured in over 130 photos; many fast-disappearing artifacts of a glorious era when brightly lit signs filled the landscape.

“Several dozen of the signs pictured in my book have disappeared since its publication, and once they’re gone, they’re not coming back,” Nick comments, ” Big reason for my passion for preserving them through photography.”

Nick talks about the cost of the neon which is expensive due to the hand-crafting that goes into each one, as well as the physical and technical requirements involved in their construction and placement, not to mention upkeep.  The fragility of glass tubing continuously exposed to harsh Chicago weather makes the survival of an old sign a kind of urban miracle, deserving, at the least, of photographic preservation. Even the many that have outlived their functional glory days have their own visual appeal. Animated neon signs, working or not, are a special treat.

Nick Freeman, a life-long resident of the Chicago area, has been involved with words and pictures throughout his professional career. Starting at Feldkamp-Malloy, one of the last of the old-time art studios in the city, he spent 30-plus years in advertising–god help him–serving as production director at Leo Burnett and other agencies.

He now devotes his time and attention to his first love, oil painting, and has exhibited his work in a number of local and regional shows. His art, both paintings and photography, can be seen at galleryfreeman.com.

After viewing his work on his website, I was amazed by his polished, realistic technique and use of color. Two of my favorites were Isla Jane and the Pumpkin Farm which were sold. But his wonderful collection offers a great painting of Dog N Suds called Root Beer, Flea Market II, the Blue Goose for sale and many others. He currently resides in St. Charles, Illinois.

Good Old Neon is available direct from Lake Claremont Press, Amazon or wherever fine gift books are sold. Founded by Sharon Woodhouse in 1994, Lake Claremont Press has been publishing amazing histories and guidebooks about Chicago by Chicago authors.

Unlike many publishers, their books truly capture the passions and knowledge of their authors. Many have been featured in national newspapers and numerous television shows such as the History Channel and The National Geographic Channel. Because of their credited field expertise, most authors are actively involved in non-for profits and several of the the greater Chicago land missions.

Please visit their site and you can sign up for the Lake Claremont Press newsletter to receive announcements about new book releases and special offers of distinguished Chicago authors.

Seek to be the very best

Which statue of Abraham Lincoln is considered to have the most accurate likeness of the president and why? What sets Victory Monument apart from other World War I memorials? Why is the Balbo Monument so controversial? Celebrated photographer, author, and art historian Larry Broutman is eager to share his vast knowledge of the fascinating history behind Chicago’s public art and iconic places. Broutman is the photographer and author of Chicago Monumental and Chicago Unleashed, the latter book; a collection of whimsical images.

Chicago Unleashed, Larry Broutman’s first book published by Lake Claremont Press in 2014, presents images that combine wildlife photographed by Broutman in the wildlands of the world and iconic Chicago urbanscapes he also photographed. The concept of these fanciful pieces was created for the Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago during its design and construction.   His second book with Lake Claremont Press, Chicago Monumental is a gorgeous full-color photographic tribute to the City of Big Shoulders that showcases over 250 Chicago monuments, memorials, statues, and fountains. Many were created by acclaimed sculptors from the past two centuries. There’s even a 3D photography section with 3D glasses included in this wonderful coffee table book.

Lake Claremont Press celebrates the power and character of place for our particular corner of the globe, Chicago and greater Chicagoland. Their nonfiction histories and guidebooks foster and reveal Chicago’s special identity by exploring our city’s history, culture, geography, built environment, people, and lore. They publish authors with specific Chicago passions and knowledge and local organizations with Chicago-centric missions.

Founded by Sharon Woodhouse in 1994, Lake Claremont Press has published over 60 titles, including local bestseller Chicago Haunts: Ghostlore of the Windy City and several award winners. Other favorites over the years have included Hollywood on Lake Michigan: 100 Years of Chicago and the Movies, The Chicago River: A Natural and Unnatural History, A Cook’s Guide to Chicago, The Streets and San Man’s Guide to Chicago Eats, The Golden Age of Chicago Children’s Television, Oldest ChicagoHistoric Bars of Chicago, and Rule 53: Capturing Hippies, Spies, Politicians, and Murderers in an American Courtroom.

Chicago Monumental has received two book awards in the last month: a Midwest Book Award for best interior design and an IPPY (Independent Publisher) Award in the Great Lakes Nonfiction category.

Since the 1990s, Larry Broutman has traveled the world over to capture the perfect photograph and has found Chicago to have a plethora of visual inspiration. His projects include work with Lincoln Park Zoo, Africa Geographic, BBC Wildlife, Children’s Memorial Hospital Clinic, and The Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago.

Broutman attended MIT where he received his S.B., S.M., and doctorate degree in the field of Materials Engineering and Science in 1963. Specializing in Polymer Engineering and Science and Composite Materials, Broutman has vast experience writing college textbooks, reference books, and technical articles. In fact, he was inducted into the Plastics Hall of Fame.

All author proceeds are donated to The Chicago Lighthouse for the Blind and Visually Disabled, and Access Living, Chicago-based nonprofit service agencies.

Larry Broutman’s impressive background and education is truly an inspiration to others and I asked him what kind of advice he would give to those young and old trying to pursue their own ambitions.“I have always followed the advice of my academic adviser at MIT where I received my B.S., M.S., and doctorate degrees. His sage words were to choose a career/profession which you love and once you choose it, seek to be the very best. So, in my case, I was guided by choosing career paths I could both enjoy and also strived to be the best. So, this thought not only helped me in my principal career in engineering, but in my second career as a photographer and author.”

Chicago Monumental may be enjoyed as a visual history, as social documentary, as a guidebook to both familiar and little-known works, as a portable art gallery or as itself a piece of public sculpture. And if like me you are always looking for the perfect gift to give to a client, an aspiring artist, photographer or those who just love our city, Chicago Monumental is a beautiful choice.